スタッフブログ

Sat

06

Aug

2016

Japanese language education

 

Now that English-medium education has become a “mainstream” strategy for attracting international students to Japanese universities, less attention seems to be paid to Japanese language education. But the question of what and how to teach students of the Japanese language remains crucial to the overall task of internationalising Japanese higher education. The simple answer to the question, of course, is “it depends on the individual”; but this answer doesn’t really help universities plan their Japanese language education curricula.

 

In the case of Japanese language education offered by universities within Japan, the primary goals seem to be (a) to prepare for higher education in a Japanese language medium, or (b) to get a job with a Japanese-speaking employer, or (c) to carry out everyday activities in Japanese. But these are “gateway” goals – focused on entry points to further education (nyuushi) or employment (shuushoku), or daily life (seikatsu). How can Japanese language education help international students better prepare for the long-term engagement with Japan that lies beyond these gateways?

 

For Japanese language learners outside Japan, the challenges are even more complex. I recently participated in a workshop overseas on Japanese language education for professional purposes. Our discussion focused on the question: what should students majoring in Japanese language know by the time they graduate? To put it another way: what’s the point of studying Japanese at university?

One approach suggested at the workshop was to focus more on so-called “business Japanese”: the language of the Japanese corporate world and the sociocultural knowledge required to make sense of it. It was also suggested that we could teach students more “labor market skills” such as resume-writing and interview techniques.

 

Considering how many Japanese companies are now actively hiring non-Japanese outside Japan, it a focus on business-oriented Japanese proficiency may well be worthwhile. But, how many graduates of Japanese language programs actually go on to work in Japanese language-speaking environments? The answer given by most participants in the workshop I attended was, “not many”. Most graduates do use their Japanese to some extent at work, but often not in Japan, not all the time, and not necessarily in ways envisaged by educators. More research in this area is needed to inform curricular planning for Japanese language education both within Japan and overseas.

 

At the same time as understanding their students and graduates better, universities need to articulate their own aims regarding Japanese language education more clearly. They need to build compelling reasons for learning Japanese beyond the “gateways” mentioned above, and connect them with their overall rationales for internationalising.

 

 

Some fascinating perspectives on the experiences of Japanese major graduates in North America can be found in the blog: What Can I Do with a BA in Japanese Studies?

0 Comments

Fri

29

May

2015

Zemi

I recently had the opportunity to talk with several students returned from semester- and year-length exchange programs at Japanese universities.

I was interested by some of their observations and would like to share them here: I think they contain some hints as to how to Japanese universities can present their programs more attractively to prospective international students.

 

The most interesting feedback from students related to their educational experiences in Japan.

Overwhelmingly, students said that the best classes they had taken in Japan were "zemi" - small-group seminar classes involving project research guided by a professor. Students had glowing reports of the interaction they had with their classmates (both Japanese students and other international students) and especially their professors. Students' comments included "I wish universities in my home country had classes like that", “they made me really feel part of the campus community”, and "this is what I call a real education".

 

Unfortunately, however, in some cases students were unable to get credit for these classes at their home institutions because the classes didn't meet the basic criteria for educational quality assurance: there was no clear syllabus or course outline, and only a very vague description of assessment tasks and educational outcomes. This suggests that the institutional requirements of "quality assurance", which are meant to ensure that students have a positive educational experience, can sometimes be very different from students' own perceptions of what a "quality" education actually is. This is an opportunity for universities (in this case, students' home institutions) to reconsider their assumptions about "quality".


These students' experiences also suggest that Japanese universities should be much more pro-active in promoting the benefits of zemi classes internationally. Zemi are of course not unique to Japan, but they are a quintessential part of the Japanese university student experience. So why not make more of them?

 

I'll share some other student insights with you next time.

0 Comments

Sun

10

May

2015

1年間修士課程のアドバンテージとディスアドバンテージ?

前のブログからすっかり間が空いてしまいました。これは本日書こうとしていることとも関係があるのですが、とにかく課題に追われて忙しかったのです。

 

私の専攻コースでは、試験期間以外でも学期中に分散して課題が出されます。それは全て最終的な成績にカウントされるものです。特に第二セメスター中は2週間に1本の小論文を生産し続ける、という状況でした(ほぼ3000ワードの課題)。書く作業も大変ですが、まず内容の道筋を立てるためには大量の文献を読むことが必要になります。この読む作業にある程度の時間が必要です。加えて、通常の授業・セミナーでも事前の準備が求められるため、常に勉強していないと間に合いません。

 

そんな中、クラスメート達の意見に変化が見えてきました。初期のブログで書いたように「修士課程が一年間であること」がイギリス留学を選択した理由として圧倒的に多かったのですが、「一年間だと足りない」と言い出すようになったのです。その理由は「授業内容がセオリーに集中している。セオリーの実務への応用についてのディスカッションもしたかった。」「授業が全部終了していないのに卒業論文のプロポーサルを提出しなければならない。」「ソーシャルライフが全く無い。せっかく外国に生活し、学生達が多様な国・地域から集まっているのに、交流する時間がない。」などです。

 

最初の意見については、特にマネジメント専攻で、学びを実務に生かすことを期待している学生が多いかもしれませんが。

 

そこで思ったことですが、日本の修士課程は2年間ですが、これは広報の仕方によっては十分アドバンテージとしてアピールできるということです。日本の授業料は英語圏の大学と比較すると低いです。休職して留学する層は費用より期間の方が大事かもしれませんが、大多数の学生は仕事を辞めて、あるいは、学部卒業後直接進学している状況を考えると、生活費も含めた2年間の費用がイギリスの1年間の費用と変わらないことを明確に示すことができれば、そして、2年間だからこそ経験できることを示せれば、アドバンテージになるのではないかと思いました。


Fri

03

Apr

2015

Nendomatsu

A new fiscal and academic year has begun. At last.

From January to March, many of the Japan-related staff I know at universities around the world received visits from Japanese university delegations. (Who can guess why?)


But many private firms doing internationalization-related work were also kept extremely busy by Japanese universities: acquaintances of mine working at printing companies, for example, said they were inundated by orders for foreign language brochures. Freelance Japanese-English translators complained (gratefully) that they were kept busy around the clock translating all kinds of university documents, from regulations to student health questionnaires. “What is it about Japanese universities?”, one translator asked me, “do they deliberately save up all their international projects for the end of the fiscal year, or do they just have a lot of money to spend then?”. I suspect that those two possibilities are closely interlinked!

 

I know that the end of the next fiscal year is still a long way off, but for what it’s worth, here are a couple of suggestions for other ways that internationalization budgets could be used up next time:

  • Instead of going on fact-finding visits to universities overseas: Do some initial research prospective partners based on shared institutional characteristics, policies, and interests. Start by benchmarking with a view to partnerships later. Conduct some qualitative surveys of international student and faculty experiences beyond the usual questionnaire evaluation format: in-depth, holistic case studies on student experiences, for example.
  • Instead of translating anything and everything: Do an assessment of foreign language needs on campus, and use the results to devise strategies and policies on language diversity. Get some professionals to rewrite foreign language materials that have been translated too hastily in the past. Draft more detailed and informative orientation materials and manuals for new faculty members recruited from outside Japan.


Any other suggestions?

0 Comments

Sat

14

Feb

2015

ユーモアあるメッセージ

これは試験期間中に校内のあちらこちらに貼られていたポスターです。カンニング防止が目的のものですが、「試験でカンニングさえしていなければ...」と涙を流す女性、インパクトがあります。

このように少し笑いを誘う方法でメッセージを伝える方法を、よく見かけます。学生の立場では、試験勉強で疲れ果てている時に、一瞬の癒しになったりしました。

Sun

01

Feb

2015

大学ホームページ改善のフォーカスグループ

少し前になりますが、私が所属している研究科のウェブサイトを更新するということで、学生フォーカスグループ(マーケティング目的で意見を聞く会)に参加をしました。


ホームページを担当している部署(Admissionsとは別のようです)が開催したものでしたが、進め方がマーケティング会社のようにプロフェッショナルだなと感じました。

お知らせはホームページおよびメールで、その後(おそらく出身地域や専攻のバランスで)選考され、今回は10名という規模でした。


2名のスタッフが対応して、1名はメモ係、1名が進行役でした。メモが追い付かないことがあるかもしれないので、念のために録音してもよいかと最初に確認され、皆の同意を得た上で録音が開始されました。

参加学生は、ナイジェリア、ギリシャ、中国、インド、ドイツ、タイ、そして日本の出身でした。


ホームページのターゲットとして「出願する前の学生にとって分かりやすいものにすること」という目的がはっきりと示され、その時の状況を思い出して回答するように求められました。

見出しの位置や内容、写真、スマートフォン用画面のレイアウトなど、学生からは私から見て有益だと思われる意見が出され、興味深いことに、出身地に関わらず、全ての項目において学生の意見はほぼ一致していました。


最後に、45分間の参加で謝礼として10ポンドいただいたのですが、この渡し方も他の学内アルバイトとは異なり、その場で現金支給でした。これも学生が参加したくなるポイントだと学生の立場になると感じた次第です。



Tue

06

Jan

2015

試験期間の大学

新年あけましておめでとうございます。

 

イギリスではお正月よりクリスマスが休暇のメインです。クリスマスが休みではない日本で、欧米からの学生や教員の気分が塞いでいるのを見たことがありますが、理解できる気がしました。日本の元旦のように、この日は「休みモード」になる習慣がついているのだと感じました。

 

クリスマス直前からお休みになっていた大学も今週から一気に動き始めました。来週からは試験期間で、今週からエッセイ等課題の提出締切が設定されている科目もあり、授業は始まっていないものの、図書館は学生で溢れかえっています。

 

今週からと書きましたがそれは学食や事務局などで、図書館は3日から開館しました。特に試験期間の10日間については、24時間無休で開館するそうです。情報は図書館のホームページでタイムリーに目立つようにアナウンスされていました。学生にとっては便利なサービスです。

 

試験に関して、図書館が提供している様々な学習支援資料の中には、「試験のプレッシャーに打ち勝つ方法」「試験勉強の方法」などもあり、試験時間をどのように配分して問題に取り組むべきかなどの解説までもがありました。

 

図書館以外では、学食が試験期間中は夜の12時までスープとパンのセットメニューを提供し、無料の朝食も提供されるそうです。

 

さらに学生寮では、「Exam Quiet Period」と銘打って、2週間は騒音を立てずできるだけ静かにするように、もし邪魔になる騒音があれば、寮の管理人もしくは大学の管理課にすぐに苦情の電話ができる、という通知がありました。

 

授業への出席率や授業中の発言などは考慮されず、試験の結果が成績の全てに反映されるため、学生は日本と比較してより必死に試験に取り組んでいるという印象を受けました。それに応じて大学側(学食は学生ユニオンですが)のこのような支援体制が生まれたのでしょうか。

 

M

 

 

Sat

29

Nov

2014

国際認証取得の取り組み

先日ビジネススクールに国際認証評価機構AACSBからの来訪がありました。同スクールは現在AMBAおよびEQUISの国際認証を取得していて、AACSBを取得すると国際認証の「triple crown (三冠)になる」ということで、スクールを挙げて今年度の目標の一つとして取り組んでいたようです。ランキングを上げるために毎年このような何かしらの目標を掲げてそれを達成しており、実際に成果として結びついているとのことです。


AACSBの来訪に備えて、私が学生の立場から垣間見ることができた2つの取り組みをご紹介します。


一つは、スクールのミッションを教職員・学生に徹底して共有することです。評価団から対象者は無作為に質問される可能性があり、それに備えていると言っていました。教職員はミッションステイトメントを暗記し、学生へは強制されることは無かったですが、教室やカフェテリアのテーブルの上に、来訪の2週間ほど前からステートメントが印刷されたカードが置かれていました。授業中に個人へも配布されました。


2つ目はデジタルテクノロジーの学習への活用を促進することです。私はアルバイトとしてiPad活用の促進委員という役割を担っているのですが(詳細は次回以降のブログでご紹介させていただきます)、この活動も具体的な例として認証団体へのアピール材料の一つとなっていたようです。


こうして取得した国際認証は、学生募集時のアピールとして多いに活用しています。ホームページはもちろん、パンフレットや大学説明会時のプレゼンテーションに必ず含めています。確かに志願者(学生)へ、その大学・プログラムの質について一定の安心感を与えているようです。


M

Fri

14

Nov

2014

留学生の出身国・地域の特徴

前回留学生の多様性について書いたので、今回は留学生の出身国・地域で日本との違いで目立った特徴について少し触れたいと思います。

 

前提として、ここでは大学院生についてのみの情報です。学部について簡単に特徴を述べると、圧倒的に国内からの学生が多く、その中で留学生は交換留学生と学位取得を目的とした留学生がいますので、学位取得を目的とした留学生は全体の割合としては非常に少ないのです。


一方、前回触れたように大学院生は圧倒的に留学生が多いです。

日本と比較した場合の一つ目の違いは、台湾学生の多さです。正確な数字は分かりませんが、中国からの留学生に近い人数がいるように感じます。興味深いことに、台湾学生が多くいるコース(専攻分野)と中国学生が多くいるコースは完全に分かれています。関心をもつ分野(=社会的に需要のある分野?)が違うようです。

二つ目は韓国学生とベトナム学生の少なさです。いまのところコースを問わず修士課程ではそれぞれ1人しか会っていません。

三つ目はナイジェリア学生の多さです。そして彼らは全学生の中でも真面目で優秀で(教育言語が英語ということも理由の一つ)、ほとんどが私費学生です。もっと日本にも来てほしいですね。


M


Sat

25

Oct

2014

留学生の多様性とアドミッションポリシー

私の通う大学では、大学院生は留学生が圧倒的に多いという特徴があります。今までに異なる研究科に通う友人達に聞いた限りだと、法学研究科の一部の専攻以外は、留学生が大多数です。留学生の出身国は非常に多様性に富んでいて、この1ヶ月の間に交流があった同級生の中だけでも、アゼルバイジャン、ヨルダン、ギリシャ、イタリア、メキシコ、アンゴラ、タンザニアなど、日本ではあまり見かけない国からの学生がいます。

 

全体として多様な国・地域の出身者がいる一方で、専攻によっては同じ出身国の学生が大多数を占めているケースも見受けられます。例えば経営大学院の一つの専攻では約200名の学生の内、7割強が中国出身です。また、工学研究科の一つの専攻では約20名の学生の内、8割がインド出身です。

 

経営大学院で中国学生が密集している状況は、学生達に少しネガティブに受け取られているように感じます。これは単に文社系の学生達の方が、出身国の多様性に期待して入学してきているというだけではなく、他の国からの学生の多くが就業経験を持つのに対して、中国出身学生は学部卒業後に直接大学院へ入学しているケースが多く、経営学のディスカッションの中で引き合いに出せる経験が少ないことも影響しているように思います。

 

一方、インド出身学生が多い工学研究科では、この分野においてインド出身学生の能力が高いため、優秀なクラスメートが多くいることが学生達に歓迎されているようです。

 

この事例から、アドミッションポリシーの重要さを感じました。

日本でも近年多く導入されているAO入試は「アドミッションポリシーに合致した学生」を入学させるものです。各コースで、どのような学生を受け入れて、どのような教育環境を創り出したいのかは異なります。これがきちんとアドミッションポリシーに、そして学生募集活動およびAO入試の選考過程に反映されることが、より良い教育環境を創り出すために必要不可欠だと改めて思いました。

 

 

Thu

23

Oct

2014

"International" (or not)

Today I would like to revisit the theme of an earlier blog entry on the names universities give to their academic programs.

 

As everyone knows, more and more Japanese universities are moving to establish degree programs in English designed to attract international students and globally-minded domestic students. What interests me is that the vast majority of these programs seem to be have titles (either official or tentative) which include the word “kokusai” (国際). I am a little concerned by the tendency to use the word “international” in the English title of these programs.

 

The first question that needs to be asked is: What makes the program “international” (or "kokusai-teki")? The answer is usually reasonably clear from a Japanese perspective: The program is part of the university’s internationalization strategy. It is usually designed to be accessible to international students; it is taught in an English medium and (at least partly) by non-Japanese faculty. What could be more "kokusai-teki" than that? While I understand that rationale, it also invites a further question: Do those features necessarily make the program “international” from a non-Japanese perspective?

 

In the country where I work as a university faculty member, it is almost impossible to find a program that isn't open to international students. Similarly, faculty are from many different national and cultural backgrounds, and it is taken for granted that all programs are in English. These attributes do not in themselves make a program “international”. I think the same is the case in many other countries. Programs that attract the label “international” are those in a discipline that is inherently international, such as “international relations”, or with a notable emphasis on international and/or intercultural perspectives, such as “international human resource management” or “international studies”. The mere fact that a program is established as part of a university’s internationalization strategy, or that it has received funding under a government program to support internationalization, does not automatically make it “international”, let alone “global” (I shall talk about "global" in another post). It is misleading to call programs "international" if their academic content does not live up to that description. 

 

Furthermore, by calling certain programs "international", universities may actually be defeating the original purpose of their internationalization strategy. The "international" label marks the programs as somehow distinct from the university's other academic offerings, which are therefore assumed to remain "domestic" and beyond the scope of internationalization. If the ultimate aim is to establish internationalization as a routine, mainstream element of university activity, this approach is counter-productive.

 

What, then, is the alternative to calling a program "international"? I don’t know. I think the answer will vary from case to case. The important thing is to have a proper discussion and name the program based on its actual academic features, not based on the university's (or government's) intention in establishing it. 

0 Comments

Sun

19

Oct

2014

大学図書館 イギリス編

同僚がオーストラリアの大学図書館について研究者/教員目線で書いたのを受けて、私もイギリスの大学図書館について学生目線から書いてみたいと思います。

 

まずは共通点から。図書を貸出しする以外の機能はこちらも充実しています。

ただし「図書館」の場所で受けられるサービスが全てというわけではありません。まずは図書館ウェブサイト上のサービスが充実しています。エッセイの書き方、リーディングのスピードを上げるテクニック、効果的なノートの取り方、参考文献の引用ルール等は、図書館ホームページ上で学べるようになっています。またウェブ上だけではなく、定期的にワークショップも開催しているので、予約をして参加することができます(無料)。私も既に2つのセッションに参加しましたが、本当に役立ちました。さらには決まった時間に専用カウンターへ行けば、マンツーマンでアドバイスをお願いすることも可能です。

 

次に異なる点です。こちらは日本の大学と同様、自習スペースも充実しています。学生数が多い大学ですが、行きたい時に場所が確保できないなんていうことはありません。もちろんグループ学習用の会話OKというスペースもあります。ノートパソコンの貸し出しをしている点も日本の大学と同じではないでしょうか。

 

他に便利だと感じているサービスは、需要が高い本だけを集めたコーナーがあって、そこの蔵書は最大4時間のみ借りられるというものです。これによって例えば課題で需要が集中している期間でも、頻繁に確認すればほとんど問題なく確保ことができます。私のクラスは200名の学生が学んでいますが、1週間の予習準備期間に本が手に入らなかったことはありません。

 

やはり英語圏の大学は有利だと思うことは、基本的に英語の書物だけで良いという点です。日本の大学が英語で開講するコースを増やす際に、英語の文献を充実することは課題の一つかと思います。現在はオンラインで手に入る資料も増えているので、そちらを活用すれば少しは解決されるのでしょうか?どちらにしても、そのような資料へのアクセスを整える専門的な図書館スタッフは必要となってくるのかもしれません。

 

最後に、同僚が海外の大学へ訪問する際は図書館に立ち寄ることをおススメしていましたが、私からはウェブサイトをチェックすることをおススメします!こちらの大学ではむしろ図書館スタッフが居ないと感じるかもしれませんが、実はその背後に充実したサービスがあるのです。

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo

Sun

12

Oct

2014

英国への進学動機

「留学生達がなぜイギリスの大学を選んだのかに興味がある」とのコメントをいただき、先週一週間で出会った大学院正規課程(修・博)で学ぶ留学生の方々(日本出身者を除く)に尋ねてみました。

 

圧倒的に多かった意見は、コース期間が短いことです。こちらでは修士課程は1年間、博士課程は3年-4年です。前提として英語圏の中で比較して探したという意見も多かったです。

 

他には博士課程の学生で「指導方法で選んだ」という答えもありました。この方は日本の外交政策を研究しているため、なぜ日本を選ばなかったのかを聞いたところ、「日本は指導方法についての情報が(英語で)ない」とのことでした。また工学部修士課程で持続可能なエネルギー開発(ソーラーパネルなど)を研究している方に聞いたところ「日本にも興味はあったが、英語で学ぶコースは無いと思っていた」との答えでした。

 

一方で、コース期間が短いことがマイナスの影響を与えている国もあるようです。例えばインドでは「修士課程の期間が自国の大学よりは短いことから、数年前からイギリスの学位は正式に認められなくなった。その結果、修士課程でイギリスを選ぶ学生が減った」との話も聞きました(※裏付けは取っていません)。それでも工学研究科やビジネススクールはやはりインド出身学生が多いです。彼らは博士課程へ進むか、インド国外で就職することを考えているようです。

 

この個人的調査(?)はしばらく続けていきたいと思います。

 

皆さまも、もし何か興味のある事項があれば、お気軽に「お問い合わせ」ページよりご連絡くださいませ。

 

Wed

08

Oct

2014

What is a university library?

 

"I went to the university library for the first time today, but all I could find was a building full of books!”

 

These words were spoken to me by a faculty member who recently relocated from the UK to Japan. What he was saying (in ironic British style, of course) was that the library he found at his new university was nothing like the libraries he had been used to before coming to Japan. In the UK, a university library tends to perform so many functions that its traditional status as "a building full of books" has become almost peripheral. 

 

 

The university library provides a wide range of advice to researchers and graduate students in areas such as data management, publishing, copyright, referencing, and even teaching and conference presentation skills. Often, specialist librarians in specific subject areas offer one-to-one consultations to help researchers plan new research projects and locate hard-to-find materials. The library also offers extracurricular learning support to undergraduate students in areas such as study skills and written and oral expression, and in some cases also manages curricular reading lists and recording of lectures for online distribution.

 

In Japan, however, services such as these tend to be spread around other locations in the university, while the library focuses mainly on its traditional functions of managing books and other academic resources. This system is fine if you understand it, but it can be confusing to faculty (and students) who are accustomed to using their university library as a one-stop shop for specialized, personalized advice on a whole range of matters relating to teaching and research. Working out where to go to get this kind of advice in a Japanese university is a challenge in itself.

 

On the other hand, I am impressed at how progressive some Japanese university libraries have been in the provision of physical learning infrastructure, such as innovative spaces for both private study and collaborative work (“learning commons”). I think libraries overseas have a lot to learn in this regard.

 

My advice: When visiting a university for the first time, don’t waste your time taking photos of the clock tower or browsing the tacky souvenirs in the student union store – you’ll learn a lot more about the university if you head straight for the library!

 

 

0 Comments

Fri

03

Oct

2014

iPad

photo

私の所属するビジネススクールでは、全員に個人のiPadが配布されています。

 

早速、(学部による)オリエンテーション時にも活用されていましたし、初回の授業でも全てのクラスにおいて、先生方が積極的に活用していこうと取り組んでいるのが伺えました。

 

今後の授業でどのように活用されていくのか、楽しみです。

 

M

Mon

29

Sep

2014

Teaching grants

I am currently preparing an application for a “teaching development grant” at my university.

 

The idea of this grant is to encourage instructors to develop innovative approaches to teaching, through a research project that will contribute to curricular development in their discipline and/or by undertaking extra training to improve their own teaching methods.

 

It is normal for primary and secondary school teachers to engage in professional development, but at university level it is more difficult to improve teaching quality through training. This is partly because academic culture tends to discourage any direct intervention in how people teach – the university classroom is somehow considered a very private space where instructors should be free from any kind of external interference (I will write more about “academic freedom” in another blog post.)

 

Through teaching development grants, universities can offer their academic staff members an incentive to engage in professional development without having to accept direct intervention in the classroom. By awarding the grants through a competitive application process, universities can also focus on the themes which they consider most important, and also monitor awardees’ progress towards achieving their goals.

 

The grant I’m applying for can be used to pay for a whole variety of expenses ranging from travel to attend training sessions, to the use of external research support services. Paradoxically, it can even be used to employ a substitute instructor to teach my classes while I’m doing the project. In other words, I can use a teaching development grant to get somebody else to do my teaching for me! 

6 Comments

Thu

25

Sep

2014

異文化適応セッション

オリエンテーションの一貫として、留学生向けに「カルチャーショックドラマ」と題したセッションがありました。

 

前に勤めていた日本の大学と同様、こちらでもUカーブ理論(正確に言えばこちらでは帰国後についても言及したWカーブ理論)を示しての説明でした。興味深かったのが、ボランティア団体の演劇で説明が行われたことです。アメリカ出身の学生がイギリスに来て直面したカルチャーショックをドラマ仕立てで見せ、途中で説明が入るというものです。内容がユーモアにあふれていて、イギリスに到着して間もない留学生達がたくさん笑ってリラックスできる場にもなっていました。

 

内容は、イギリス人は「列をつくって必ずそれに従う」「電車の中で見知らぬ人に話しかけない(天気の話しだけは別)」、あるいはイギリスは「雨がよくふる」「寒い」など守るべきルールやネガティブに捉えがちなことをユニークに見せていました。

 

「異文化適応のプロセスとして『イギリスなんて大嫌い』『大学が最悪』『自分は最低の選択をした』と感じる時期は皆が経験することです」と最初に言われると、実際にそうなった時により客観的に捉えることができ、不安・不満が軽減するかもしれませんよね。

 

M

Mon

22

Sep

2014

Is there a strategy behind the name?

インタークリエーションズ・ブログへようこそ!私はインタークリエーションズの代表を務めながら、オーストラリアの大学で教壇に立っている者です。このブログでは、「海外からみた日本の大学」や自らの「大学教員体験記」など、色々なことを皆さんと共有したいと思っています。あまり深く考え込まずに書きますので、皆さんも同じ気持ちで読んで下されば幸いです。

基本的に英語で書きます。(英語のネイティヴスピーカーなので...お許しください。)

 

Welcome to the InterCreations blog! I look forward to sharing with you my impressions of Japanese universities "from the outside" and my own experiences as an academic staff member at an Australian university. I welcome your comments and questions!

 

First up: a question. What is the most interesting university program (degree, course, etc.) title you've come across? 

 

In Japan, following the government's relaxation of university establishment standards in the 1990s, universities moved quickly to invent new names for their programs. Back then, titles such as Human Science (人間科学) and Welfare Studies (福祉学) sounded strange in contrast to the discipline-based nomenclature that had been used previously. These days, however, such titles are considered mainstream, and even a little boring, compared to some of the "creative" offerings now available at Japanese universities. What is your favorite?

 

Universities overseas have been just as creative. Look at this run-down of some of the interesting degrees now available at UK universities (I like the sound of "Cruise Management"). And how about this list of strange course titles from the US (difficult to choose between "Lego Robotics" and "Maple Syrup")? 

 

How do program titles contribute to (or detract from) a university's brand? Could a more strategic approach to naming academic programs help Japanese universities become more globally competitive? 

 

1 Comments

Tue

16

Sep

2014

ウェルカムキット

こちらがピックアップ時に受け取ったウェルカムキットです。

 

まず役に立ったのは地図でした。出張のようにホテル滞在ではないので、すぐに必要なものが出てきます。寮の受入担当スタッフ(もちろん学生アルバイト)にスーパーの場所を聞いて出かけたのですが、やはり地図無しでは道に迷ったでしょう。

 

左下の紙はタクシーに乗る前に学生スタッフから渡されたものです。行先と料金が書いてあります。

 

真ん中のYour Arrivalは国際部が発行しているもので、到着後一週間にやるべきことなどが書いてあります。To Doリストのチェック欄などもあり、とても便利でした。

 

日本では見ないものでは、携帯電話のSIMカードがありました。すでに1ポンド分チャージがされており、母国の家族に到着の連絡をするには十分だと促されました。日本のようにSIMロックされた携帯電話を持っている方が少数派であるため、ほとんどの学生はこのSIMを手持ちの電話に入れるだけですぐに通話をすることができます。(おそらく1ポンドのチャージも電話会社側のサービスだと思います。今後も使い続けてくれれば顧客獲得になるので。)大学事務局の立場でも、親御さんからの到着確認問い合わせへの対応が減らせてよいなと思いました。

 

M

picture

Mon

15

Sep

2014

ピックアップサービス

初めて留学生の立場でピックアップサービスを体験しました。 さすが留学生受け入れ大国のイギリス(空港や駅で他の大学のピックアップスタッフも見かけましたが、同じような対応をしている様子)。対応がスマートでした。

 

どの点がスマートかというと:

・個々の到着時間に個別対応するピックアップであり、不足はない。

・にもかかわらず、過剰サービスではない→学生スタッフのみを使い、コストおよびマンパワー面で大学にあまり負担がかかっていないと思われれる内容。

・学生スタッフをよくトレーニングしている。アルバイトになるそうだが、手際のよさはもちろん、ホスピタリティも十分に感じた。

・トラブル対応もお願いできる(例:チェックイン荷物の到着遅延など)

・その場で選択肢があることに好感がもてた(タクシーor公共バス)。

・(タクシーの場合)前もってタクシー会社と値段設定を決めているため、メーターを心配することも、降りる時に慣れない通貨をあわてて計算する必要もない。

・ここでウェルカムキットを渡してくれた→到着初日にとても役立った

 

ウェルカムキットについては次のブログで紹介しますね。

 

 M

 

InterCreations provides services that creatively integrate language, organizational strategy and market intelligence to achieve real results in internationalization. Read more . . . 

インター・クリエーションズは、大学国際化のプロフェッショナル集団です。2007年にオーストラリア・メルボルンで設立、日本にも拠点を置いています。

実務経験者と学術研究者が一体となって真の国際化を実現させるソリューションをご提供します。国際化関連の実務でお困りのこと、海外での新展開に関することなど、お気軽にお問い合わせください

 

このページをシェアしましょう!

Share this page!

スタッフブログ